Temporal Holds

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Common Holds

  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hold far.jpg
    Temporal hold, finger in the ear canal
  • Biwiki temporal 1 da sein 2017-01.JPG
    Temporal hold, finger in the ear canal
  • Biwiki temporal 2 da sein 2017-01.JPG
    Temporal hold, finger in the ear canal
  • Biwiki temporal 3 da sein 2017-01.JPG
    Temporal hold, finger in the ear canal
  • Biwiki temporal 4 da sein 2017-01.JPG
    Temporal hold, finger in the ear canal
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hold plastic from above.jpg
    Temporal hold, plastic skull
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hold plastic.jpg
    Temporal hold, plastic skull
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hole close.jpg
    Temporal hold, finger in the ear canal
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear lobe far.jpg
    Temporal hold, holding the ear
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear lobe.jpg
    Temporal hold, holding the ear
  • Bi wiki hold cradle plus mastoid.jpg
    Temporal hold, via adapted cradle hold
  • Dominique degranges temporal hold.jpg
    Temporal hold line drawing
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hold far.jpg
  • Biwiki temporal 1 da sein 2017-01.JPG
  • Biwiki temporal 2 da sein 2017-01.JPG
  • Biwiki temporal 3 da sein 2017-01.JPG
  • Biwiki temporal 4 da sein 2017-01.JPG
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hold plastic from above.jpg
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hold plastic.jpg
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear hole close.jpg
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear lobe far.jpg
  • Bi wiki hold temporal ear lobe.jpg
  • Bi wiki hold cradle plus mastoid.jpg
  • Dominique degranges temporal hold.jpg

Overview

Temporal hold: Finger in the ear canal

The most common hold for the temporal bones is with the middle finger in the ear canal (it is actually very comfortable for practitioner and client), first finger on the zygomatic process and third and forth fingers on the mastoid.

Bi wiki hold temporal ear hold far.jpg Biwiki temporal 3 da sein 2017-01.JPG

Variations

Temporal hold: Holding the ear

In this hold the ear is used to orient to the temporal bone. The thenar eminence (base of the thumb) can rest on the upper ear with the thumb extending down to the ear lobe and the fingers behind the ear. Another version of this hold is the pad of the thumb and fingers grasping the ear.

Bi wiki hold temporal ear lobe.jpg

Temporal hold: Adapted cradle hold

In this hold the first finger is allowed to contact the mastoid when in the cradle hold and the thumb can rest on the squama.

Bi wiki hold cradle plus mastoid.jpg

Treatment Notes

Temporal bones are in four parts at birth

Each bone contains a number of ossification centres. Some of the bones of the cranium can have many such centres. These centres start to develop from week 6 after fertilization. At birth the temporal bones consist of four parts: squamosal/zygomatic, petro/mastoid, tympanic ring, and styloid process. This is why the temporal bone looks like it has been stuck together from a number of parts. It also explains why the temporal bone has such an unusual primary respiratory motion - a 'wobbly wheel' motion according to W.G. Sutherland

Working with the Intraosseous temporal bone

The tympanic ring and styloid process are very small compared to the petro/mastoid portion (dense bone formed in compression from cartilage and containing the vestibulocochlear apparatus) and the squamosa;/zygomatic portion (thin bone formed in stretch from membrane). These two major parts of the temporal bone can get distorted at birth and affect the dynamics of the adult temporal bone.

Jugular foramen

Holding the ear is often used to orient to the jugular foramen. The direction of ease would be for the temporal bone to move lateral and posterior at an angle of around 45 deg, out and down, towards the table. This angle follows the axis of the petrous portion as it fits into the cranial base.

Relevant Anatomy

Skull da sein edited-2 temporal v1.jpg Dominique degranges temporal bone.jpg Temporal bone Wellcome.jpg

References